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Enterprise JavaBeans 3.1
by Andrew Lee Rubinger, Bill Burke


O'Reilly Media
sixth edition edition
September 2010
768 pages

Reviewed by Jaikiran Pai, September 2011
  (8 of 10)



"Enterprise JavaBeans 3.1 (6th edition)", attempts to explain the various services provided by EJB3 and how those services can be applied in real world practical applications. The book does a very good job in covering these features and at the same time not overwhelming the readers with the information.

The first few chapters steadily build up the EJB3 concepts and how they be applied in real world applications. The good thing about these chapters is that they do not expose the readers to any code. Once the concepts have been introduced to the users, the next few chapters of the book get into the details of various EJB types. This includes session beans and message driven beans. Each of these chapters first explain the bean type in detail and its usage before getting into an example for that bean type.

Once that's covered, the book then moves onto explaining how an application can use the persistence service API (JPA) along with EJB3. This part is divided into multiple chapters and these chapter cover various details right from explaining what Java Persistence API provides to mapping your database tables to the corresponding Java entities. It further goes on to explain the usage of the query API made available by the JPA spec.

The latter part of the book covers various EJB3 container services like security, transaction, timerservice and dependency injection with EJB3 components (and other server side components in general). The book also has some chapters on using your EJB3 beans as WebService endpoints.

The last part of the book contains a whole lot of examples and a brief introduction to Shrinkwrap (http://jboss.org/shrinkwrap) which is Java API for building archives (like jar, war, ear files) and Arquillian (http://jboss.org/arquillian) which is an in-container testing framework.

Overall, the author does a very good job in covering the entire set of EJB3 features in a very articulate manner. The author stresses more on the concepts and their applicability rather than forcing some code onto the readers. The book does have an entire last section dedicated to examples and code.

A couple of places which I thought could be improved are:

- Ordering of some of the chapters in the book. Part 3 of the book goes into the details of persistence (JPA usage) and for a few chapters you feel that you are reading a book on Java Persistence, rather than Enterprise Java Beans. In my opinion, Part 4 of the book which covers various core EJB3 container services (like transactions, security etc...) should have been switched with Part 3.

- The chapter on MDB, in my opinion, gets a bit too lengthy and perhaps could have to been shortened a bit.

Other than that, I found the book to be very good and a valuable read.

P.S: Although I know the the author of the book personally and we work for the same company and the same team, I've tried to keep this review unbiased.

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Disclosure: I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for writing this review on behalf of CodeRanch.

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Pro Spring 2.5
by Jan Machacek, Jessica Ditt, Aleksa Vukotic, Anirvan Chakraborty


Apress
1 edition
August 2008
920 pages

Reviewed by Mark Spritzler, December 2008
  (9 of 10)


8 1/2, but since we only have 8 or 9, I liked it enough to make sure I rounded up instead of down.

I highly recommend this book to learn Core Spring. It is the only book currently out by Dec 08 that covers version 2.5. Other books still only cover 2.0

I found the writing easy to understand, I found that they covered the material very well with good examples. They cover a lot of material and leave you with great in-depth knowledge in each of those Spring technologies.

Now, I don't agree with everything they say in the book, but it isn't that they are wrong, but that I just disagree with certain statements. For example, in a Note section they stated that "They do not encourage the use of annotations on the objects you will persist using Hibernate." Using JPA Annotations, from an ORM tool expert, is a best practice and makes your life so much easier, in my opinion, and many other ORM experts. This note should have been left out of the book, unless they wanted to fully cover why.

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Hibernate Made Easy
by Cameron McKenzie


Self published
1 edition
2008
434 pages

Reviewed by Mark Spritzler, July 2008
  (9 of 10)


Hibernate is a subject dear to my heart. It is a database tool that I would not live without. However, it has a steep learning curve. In Hibernate Made Easy, author Cameron McKenzie does a great job in getting someone who is brand new to Hibernate, up and running quickly and understanding the basics of Hibernate to effectively take on its learning curve.

Keep in mind when reading this book, that in order to keep it simple, some alternative solutions are not discussed. This is a book to get you started. So it didn't mention that you can have Hibernate automatically search your classpath for @Entity classes, but used addAnnotatedClass() method calls. This is ok, and might be fixed by the time you buy the book.

Now, there are many pieces to the Hibernate puzzle and Cameron manages to pick the subjects that are the necessary building blocks to move on to the more advanced topics. If you are just learning Hibernate, I highly recommend this book to take you on the path of righteousness.

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EJB 3 in Action
by Debu Panda, Reza Rahman, Derek Lane


Manning Publications
1 edition
April 2007
712 pages

Reviewed by Jeanne Boyarsky, May 2007
  (9 of 10)


"EJB 3 in Action" manages to be an excellent read for both people new to EJB and people who have been using EJB 2.X. There are side notes throughout about significant changes from EJB 2.X. For larger topics that someone new to EJB 2.X might not know, the topic is covered in the appendix. The examples are interesting and well written, so it isn't boring reading about the purpose of a session bean if you already know it.

What really impressed me were the differences between this book and Sun's J2EE tutorial. The majority of examples used Java 5 syntax (for looping and the like.) This made the examples feel like EJB 3 examples rather than an old book robotically updated. Further, the authors explain when to use a deployment descriptor vs annotations. Sun sticks to the party line and barely mentions the deployment descriptor. The "EJB 3 in Action" approach is much more useful for gaining practical advice.

Best practices are described throughout. The authors don't assume you know Java 5 features and explain them as necessary. All the expected topics are covered. Additionally, there are chapters on Spring integration and migrating from EJB 2.X. The examples are app server agnostic, but they show you how to use one in the appendix. Finally, the appendixes provide an excellent reference for both the annotations and deployment descriptor.

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Manning Publications
1 edition
April 2007
712 pages

Reviewed by Christophe Verre, December 2008
  (9 of 10)


One might say that "EJB3 In Action" is actually two books in one. Both EJB3's core functionality (Session beans, message driven beans, interceptors, transactions, exceptions...) and Java Persistence API (JPA) are covered. Learning Enterprise Java Beans is not an easy task, no matter how cleaner EJB3 are compared to EJB2. "EJB3 In Action" achieves to make a lot of advanced topics look easy. Not only does it provide the necessary information to understand EJB3 in an enjoyable style, it also introduces some best practices, performance issues, and illustrates important concepts with relevant code snippets. There is enough examples to keep you busy trying it yourself on your favorite container, as well as the downloadable application which is used throughout the book. There are also chapters about interoperability with EJB2, about using EJB3 with the Spring framework, well enough to satisfy the most curious and avid developers. All in all, the authors have made a fantastic job keeping the reader focused and entertained.

I used this book to study Sun's SCBCD certification. Although the book does not go as deep into the EJB specification as the exam does, I'm confident enough to say that, armed with this book and an exam simulator to fill the gaps, any serious developer can successfully pass.

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Head First EJB: Passing the Sun Certified Business Component Developer Exam
by Kathy Sierra, Bert Bates


O'Reilly
1 edition
October 2003
700 pages

Reviewed by Matthew Phillips, December 2003
  (8 of 10)


Kathy and Bert strike again with their wacky ways. They'll approach a topic in just about any method they can think of to make you learn this stuff and they can think of a lot.

The chapters are organized well. I like that each chapter opens with the exam objectives it will cover along with a "plain English" interpretation of what those objectives really mean. That is the way of the whole book. Code which requires explanation has the explanation written write next to it, with arrows pointing to the appropriate lines. Everything in the book is explained in two or more different fashions which insures the information will get into your head to stay.

I do have one critism, and it was big enough for me to drop the rating from 10 to an 8. I believe that writing and deploying code is essential to learn any API and EJB is no exception. The authors did not emphasize that method of teaching enough for me. If you are looking for just the raw facts made interesting, then this is the book for you. If you want an emphasis on writing and deploying code as well, then you should probably read this book anyway and then move on to one of the other EJB books on the market.

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Bitter EJB
by Bruce Tate, Mike Clark, Bob Lee, Patrick Linskey


Manning Publications
1 edition
June 2003
350 pages

Reviewed by Paul Stevens, August 2003
  (9 of 10)


This book is a must read for EJB developers. It is not a how to book but should be used with one. What it does is show the many pitfalls that can happen during EJB projects. It goes beyond describing all that can go wrong but what can be done to prevent it or correct it.

This book is a must read before you begin an EJB project. It will help prevent design problems from becoming application problems.

Get this book with a how-to book and learn not only how to code but how to use EJBs.

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Applying Enterprise JavaBeans
by Vlada Matena, Sanjeev Krishnan, Beth Stearns


Addison-Wesley Professional
second edition
May 2003
496 pages

Reviewed by Paul Stevens, August 2003
  (9 of 10)


This is a well written book on EJB. There are many code examples and diagrams. The authors do an excellent job of explaining how and when to use the various types of beans. A technical book that easy to read.

The authors only show the relevant parts of code in the examples but include the complete code in an appendix. This allows for better understanding of what the authors are trying to convey.

This is a book that will not end up on the shelf gathering dust. It is one of the few technical books that I will reread.

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Addison-Wesley Professional
second edition
May 2003
496 pages

Reviewed by Thomas Paul, May 2003
  (9 of 10)


This new edition of " Applying Enterprise JavaBeans" is a well written look at the Enterprise JavaBeans 2.1 specification. The explanations of the topics are in-depth and yet easy to follow. The authors provide diagrams and supporting code samples demonstrating how to write code for each topic covered. They also provide explanations of when a particular technology is appropriate for your applications. The book even has a glossary if you forgot what an acronym stands for.

The book covers all the usual topics one would expect in a book on EJBs. It starts with a general overview and then covers each of the various bean types. Session beans (stateful and stateless), message driven beans, and entity beans are each covered. An example is discussed which includes packaging of theapplication for production. The following chapter covers integrating web services into your EJB applications. Subsequent chapters cover transactions and security. The authors have done a great job of explaining not just how to code EJBs but also how they work within an application server, which you need to know to use EJBs successfully.

The book is similar to the O'Reilly book in size and scope although this book has the advantage of being more current. Overall, the book is well written, easy to follow, and extremely useful. If you are new to EJBs or if you are looking for a book to bring you up to date on the new specification then this book will make a good choice.

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EJB Cookbook
by Benjamin G. Sullins, Mark B. Whipple


Manning Publications
1 edition
May 2003
300 pages

Reviewed by Lasse Koskela, December 2003
  (7 of 10)


EJB Cookbook is a collection of recipes for the common EJB developer, wondering how a certain task can be accomplished with EJBs.

The authors state early on that the focus is not on teaching the EJB technology and basics. Despite of what the authors just said in the preface, the book starts with exactly the kind of basics that encourage quick browsing.

The 2nd chapter is a U-turn and points the book to the right direction for most of the journey. The overall level of the recipes is still a bit too simple for my liking -- the toughest questions have been left out. On the plus side, I am happy with the fact that the authors have included chapters on using XDoclet for EJB development and on unit testing EJBs with Cactus. The body of the book is, simply put, a compact reference for accomplishing recurring development tasks.

Excluding the chapters on XDoclet and unit testing, the EJB Cookbook is not an exceptional book. It is a reference, albeit a useful one.

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Enterprise JavaBeans 2.1
by Stefan Denninger, Ingo Peters, Rob Castenada


Apress
1 edition
April 2003
480 pages

Reviewed by Thomas Paul, May 2003
  (8 of 10)


This book is aimed towards the experienced Java developer who is familiar with distributed environments, Servlets, JSPs, and JDBC and wants to get a good in-depth introduction into Enterprise JavaBeans. The book starts with an introduction to EJB technology and the EJB architecture in general. This book is translated into English and these beginning chapters seem to suffer a little bit in the translation as some of the sentences are poorly constructed. The later chapters don't have this problem however. After the introduction, the book covers each of the different types of beans (session, entity, and message) in detail with a discussion of when and how to use them. Examples of their use from both the server and client side are provided. The deployment descriptors for each type are also covered. Transactions and security are discussed with examples that help to clearly explain how these mechanisms work in EJBs. The authors then discuss some of the practical issues that arise when developing an EJB application such as performance and bean interaction. In the final chapter, the authors explain where EJB fits in with Web Services and then give a brief discussion of the standard timer service added to EJB 2.1. The authors do a good job of not just showing how to use EJBs but also explaining what it is and why you would want to use it. The level of detail makes this a good book for both developers and architects.

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Java for the Web with Servlets, JSP, and EJB
by Budi Kurniawan


Sams
unknown edition
April 2002
992 pages

Reviewed by Carl Trusiak, June 2002
  (3 of 10)


This book can be used to learn all the basics of Servlets, JSP's and EJB's. It provides great coverage of all the basics. From that point on it fails! Anyone creating a system using most of the methodologies shown in this book will be disappointed. It constantly demonstrates the things not to do. Especially in respect to DataBase connections. A mention is made on one page of DB Pools and JNDI DataSource then, every example has connections made in a haphazard fashion. JSP TagLibs are introduced and immediately follow by JSP Examples filled with scripting, including making connections to a database. In the DBBean example, the only thing preventing serious concurrency problems with the connection is the fact that the bean is placed in page scope. This causes the connection to be recreated with each page request. When EJB's where introduced, I felt sure the author would use a JNDI DataSource, instead JNDI is used to lookup the Database information (such as the URL) and make individual connections. No attempt is made to demonstrate most of the performance enhancing patterns that can be used with EJB's. Not a book to help learn to Build Scalable Systems!

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EJB Design Patterns: Advanced Patterns, Processes, and Idioms
by Floyd Marinescu, Ed Roman


Wiley
unknown edition
February 2002
288 pages

Reviewed by Ajith Kallambella, April 2002
  (10 of 10)


Take the most popular J2EE resource - theserverside.com. Have the people who actually built the site using J2EE technologies throw in the best practices as EJB design patterns. Open the stage for hundreds of developers to read, critique and say yea or nay. Painstakingly update the pattern repository incorporating the developer feedback. Repeat this process for nearly a year. What do you get? The best catalog of EJB design patterns ever written - by developers for developers.

Let's face it. Many of the standard GOF design patterns are hard to apply in the EJB world. The learning curve is steep and the mistakes can be very expensive. This book gives you everything you need to design, develop, deploy and maintain industry strength J2EE applications using EJB technology.

The book is divided into two parts. Part one - EJB Pattern Language is a repository of the true and the tried strategies such as Transaction and Persistence Patterns, Session Facade, and Message Facade, JDBC for reading, Versioning etc. Part Two - titled "Best Practices for EJB Design and Implementation" is a collection of idioms, tips, do's and dont's specific to EJB projects.

This book is a great working reference, every EJB developer must have on the bookshelf. For those who have just begun their journey through the J2EE land, getting started with "Mastering Enterprise JavasBeans-2nd Edition by Ed Roman" provides the required background.

The book comes with a nifty chart for quick reference. The implementations can be downloaded freely from theserverside.com.

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J2EE FrontEnd Technologies: A Programmer's Guide to Servlets, JavaServer Pages, and Enterprise JavaBeans
by Lennart Jorelid


Apress
1 edition
December 2001
1128 pages

Reviewed by Thomas Paul, February 2002
  (6 of 10)


"J2EE FrontEnd Technologies" refers to itself as a "programmer's guide" and that is probably the best description of it. While it also claims to be "chock full of code examples" and contains "what you need to know," it falls short in both these areas. What you will find is a fairly detailed and yet limited explanation of the three major J2EE technologies, Servlets, JSPs, and EJBs. Although you will find extensive information for these three areas, there are many details left out and there is little attempt made to tie the three pieces together. For example, you will not find any examples of linking servlets and JSPs other than by using the Struts framework. You will also find no more than a brief mention of message driven EJBs. There are numerous UML diagrams throughout the book but in many cases they add little beyond what you can get from looking at the APIs. The examples in the book tend to be overly simplistic, in some cases wasting many pages to show an example that could have been summarized in a few lines of code. The best section of the book is the section on EJBs. The author's detailed description of EJB deployment descriptors is better than what you will find in most EJB books. This section also features the most complete examples found in the book. Overall this book does contain value, although it fails as an introduction or tutorial on the technologies that it covers.

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Mastering Enterprise JavaBeans (2nd Edition)
by Ed Roman


Wiley
second edition
December 2001
672 pages

Reviewed by Ersin Eser, January 2002
  (10 of 10)


Magnificent book. The authors explain the subject thoroughly. The book is written in a readable and succinct format.

This book will not only teach you the subject, but also guide you thru the overwhelming intenseness of the EJB arena and related J2EE technologies by clearing your understanding. The outcome of the great public feedback involved in the writing of the book on theserverside.com is priceless.

If you are still debating about buying it, you are wasting your precious time, my friend. You cannot afford to miss this book.

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Enterprise Java Beans, 3rd Edition
by Richard Monson-Haefel


O'Reilly
third edition
October 2001
550 pages

Reviewed by Thomas Paul, November 2001
  (9 of 10)


This is the third edition of "Enterprise JavaBeans" in three years, which shows how popular this book is and how fast EJB technology is changing. This new edition has been updated for EJB 2.0 and it gives excellent coverage to the many changes in the new specification. Some of the changes covered include message-driven beans, the new CMP model for entity beans, the EJB Query Language, and how to build complex relationships between entity beans.

The book is written for the advanced Java developer who wants to learn the complexities of Enterprise JavaBeans. This is not a simple tutorial for the beginner. The book starts with a brief introduction to EJB and then spends the next couple of chapters covering the complexities of the EJB architecture. After a brief review of the basics of EJB, the author spends the next three chapters covering the complexities of EJB 2.0 container managed persistence. Bean-Managed persistence and the entity-container contract are then covered followed by a chapter on session beans. The new message-driven beans are given a chapter. The book ends up with a chapter on design considerations for J2EE applications.

The author does an excellent job of including diagrams at just the right places to help clarify difficult topics. Anyone who will be working with EJB 2.0 should own this book. Note: Companion workbooks are available from the O'Reilly website. These include instructions and versions of the sample programs for WebLogic and WebSphere.

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Professional EJB
by Sarang, Gabhart, Tost, McAllister, Adatia, Juric, Osborne, Arni, Lott, Nagarajan,Berry, O'Connor, Griffin, Mulder,Young


Wrox
1 edition
July 2001
1200 pages

Reviewed by Ajith Kallambella, September 2001
  (8 of 10)


Don't let the title scare you away - this book is a great companion for professionals and amateurs alike.

The book efficiently covers the what's, why's and how's of the EJB technology. Chapters are very well structured and quite comprehensive. It has all the latest in EJB technology including the EJB 2.0, an interesting coverage of "Local EJB" specifications and using EJBs as Web Services. Whether you are just beginning to learn EJBs( excellent chapters on Entity, Session and Message Driven beans ) or a real pro( checkout the topics on Design Strategies, EJB Performance and Scalability and COM based EJB clients), you will most certainly find something palatable.

Pros - Most current, extremely comprehensive coverage, experienced authors, examples that leverage on real life scenarios, great appendices on some of the popular App servers.

Cons - Big, fat and very minor inconsistencies.

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Instant Enterprise JavaBeans
by Paul Tremblett


McGraw-Hill
second edition
January 2001
550 pages

Reviewed by Thomas Paul, February 2001
  (9 of 10)


"Instant Enterprise JavaBeans" does an excellent job of explaining EJB technology, how to develop programs to use the technology, and how to deploy those programs. Using the reference implementation that comes with the Sun J2EE, the author covers all aspects of developing and deploying EJB applications. The author starts with a good explanation of the Java 2 Enterprise Edition including n-tier architecture and then demonstrates a basic "hello world" EJB class. Using this class, the author shows us how to use the Deploy Tool to deploy and run EJB applications. In each chapter, we are taken step-by-step through the entire process required to produce working EJB applications. The author shows us how to develop stateless and stateful session beans and entity beans using bean-managed and container-managed persistence. Several clear examples of each type of bean are discussed. He then uses the different types of beans to create a more complex example that even includes an interface to a web ready cellular phone. In later chapters, he shows us many of the additional features available in EJB servers including creating container-managed transactions, authenticating users, and customizing applications using deployment descriptors. The author finishes up with a brief discussion of performance issues. Even though the book only discusses the J2EE reference implementation, by covering the basic functions found in an EJB server we learn what to look for in other EJB servers. My one complaint is that the index is almost useless, even lacking entries for such basic topics as "transaction" and "database".

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Applying Enterprise JavaBeans - Component-Based Development for the J2EE Platform
by Matena, Vlada / Stearns, Beth


Pearson Education
unknown edition
December 2000
436 pages

Reviewed by Paul Wheaton, March 2001
  (8 of 10)


A sort of EJB tutorial from Sun press. I found it to be direct and thorough. Definitely one of the best books on learning EJB although I still see room for improvement in all of the EJB books. I do feel that this one makes several of the more complicated EJB issues easy to understand - and for that reason I would have to say that at this writing, this is the best book for learning EJB.

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Pearson Education
unknown edition
December 2000
436 pages

Reviewed by Steve Endres, February 2001
  (5 of 10)


Matena and Stearns do a good job of walking the reader through the meriad of topics related to EJBs. They espouse the promise of component based design and show how EJBs attempt to deliver. From architectural overviews of services offered by containers to concepts around the social structure for software bean development, they build a model for developing large scale systems using the four-tiered J2EE platform.
The book makes use of a web-based employee benefits applications to shed light on the jargon and deligation model used in EJB development. The authors also do a nice job of separating out when to use stateless session beans vs stateful session beans. The book is easy to follow and should be a nice companion for those needing details of building components. As the title of the book suggests, it is about applying the various EJBs not neccessarily why the spec went one way or the other.
The books most redeming quality is that it portrays what should happen in the container by way of sequence diagrams. These are most valuable in building a mental model of how to interact and test software that uses containers. They do a fairly nice job of highlighting the promises surrounding bean managed persistence versus container managed persistence. They also shed some light on how containers manage the instances of beans during the different states of their existence.
Nearly the whole second half of the book explains the use entity beans. They follow through with a rather lengthy employee benefits enrollment sample application that uses more concepts of entity beans than the smaller sample application they outlined using session beans.
I recommend the book for those trying to get their hands around the basic design rules of EJBs. For those already covered with J2EE battle scars, the general level of the book may not be as valuable. Additionally, I found the last two chapters on Transactions and Security to be more guiding in nature than as applied as the first part of the book. These two chapters provide interesting outlines on the responsibility between the containers and the EJBs in the current specification. After reading the book I wondered if the authors felt that the two topics were too large in scope to cover before the sample application, less the reader get bogged down in too many issues.

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